Monthly Archives: January 2009

And the winner is

Sorry this post is a little late, but here are the winners of the audiobooks giveaways.  Here goes:

Little Pink House:
Valorie
Meg89
Deidre

Geography of Bliss:
Bermudaonion
Darby Lohrding
Renee G

Beat the Reaper:
Mamacitay2j
Susan C
Beth

I have emailed all of you as I need your full mailing address to send to the publisher.  Thank you everyone for visiting my blog and entering.  Please make sure to stop back as I hope to have some more giveaways in the near future!

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Weekly Geeks 2009-03

weekly-geeksFor your assignment this week, choose two or more of the following questions:

1) How do you feel about classic literature? Are you intimidated by it? Love it? Not sure because you never actually tried it? Don’t get why anyone reads anything else? Which classics, if any, have you truly loved? Which would you recommend for someone who has very little experience reading older books? Go all out, sell us on it!

2) A challenge, should you choose to accept it: Read at least one chapter of a classic novel, preferably by an author you’re not familiar with. Did you know you can find lots of classics in the public domain on the web? Check out The Popular Classic Book Corner
, for example. Write a mini-review based on this chapter: what are your first impressions? Would you read further? (For a larger selection of authors, try The Complete Classic Literature Library).

3) Let’s say you’re vacationing with your dear cousin Myrtle, and she forgot to bring a book. The two of you venture into the hip independent bookstore around the corner, where she primly announces that she only reads classic literature. If you don’t find her a book, she’ll never let you get any reading done! What contemporary book/s with classic appeal would you pull off the shelf for her?

4) As you explore the other Weekly Geeks posts: Did any inspire you to want to read a book you’ve never read before—or reread one to give it another chance? Tell us all about it, including a link to the post or posts that sparked your interest. If you end up reading the book, be sure to include a link to your post about it in a future Weekly Geeks post!

When I was in high school I was in advanced English – in my Junior year we were required to read the classics.  At first I was upset because it was “forced” on us, but some of my favorite books are considered classics.  The Count of Monte Cristo is still one of my 5 favorite books – I can’t imagine anything changing that.  It has been MANY years since I have read it, and although some of the story has been lost in my memory I still know that this is where I would put it.  I believe that I will try to read it again this year to refresh my memory.

I am also a HUGE fan of Edgar Allen Poe.  Horror/Suspense/Mystery books are my favorite type and I am not sure if there is anyone that embraces this genre moreso that he does.  Again, it has been many years but I do have his collection leatherbound sitting on my shelf.  Maybe I should pick it up and read a little today – The Tell-tale Heart is so chilling, but what piece of work by him isn’t?

There are many classics that I haven’t read….many, many, many!  But, after reading the post by Reading Adventures I too am sad to say that I have never read anything by Jane Austen.  I believe that I too will add Pride and Prejudice to my library list.  There are many more and I may come back to revise this list as I continue to go through the posts for this week. 

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Lost Book Challenge

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I LOVE the show LOST!!!  I am so glad that they started showing it from the beginning on G4 because I had not watched it previously, but am so hooked.  And, Sawyer is one of my favorite characters, so I love the pic of him reading.  I thought this was a great challenge, and am hoping I can finish it.  Here is my list of books:

1. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
2. The Dark Horse by Tami Hoag
3. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
4. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
5. The Stand by Stephen King

Want to join?  Click here for more details.

 

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The Bishop’s Daughter by Tiffany L. Warren

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Darrin Bainbridge is your typical playboy in need of love, but not yet ready. He is a freelance journalist trying to break his big story. After a visit from his mother, Darrin gets an idea. He has heard all kinds of stories about “Hollywood” ministers who hold their church services on television, live in nice houses, drive nice cars, and have lots of money and women. Darrin is disgusted by it all especially when his mother Priscilla starts shouting praises for Atlanta Bishop Kumal Prentiss. Darrin decides to go to Atlanta, become a member of the bishop’s church, and expose him for the hustling fraud that he believes he is. He just never planned on falling in love with the Bishop’s daughter.

Darrin suddenly finds himself torn between his new found friend and his possible big break. 

Darrin Bainbridge is a writer, and has been looking for his big break for quite some time.  Even though he is living off of  a trust fund, he feels he really needs to prove something to himself, and everyone else who doubts him.  He knows he’s got it in him, and when he sees Bishop Prentiss on the television a lightbulb goes off.  What preacher out there doesn’t have a few skeletons in their closet and how big would he be if he could expose them?

In order to get the details for his “expose”, Darrin moves to Atlanta and actually joins the church the Bishop is in charge of – Freedom of Life.  He never expects to be so enthralled by the Bishop’s delivery, and becomes and active member of the church.  He begins to wonder if this is one holy man that doesn’t have any secrets.  Is it possible, or will he find out some information that could make his career soar but take down the career of someone he has come to admire?

Tiffany L. Warren is a technology manager who lives in suburban Cleveland, Ohio with her husband and four children. She is also the author of the critically acclaimed novel, Farther Than I Meant to Go, Longer Than I Meant to Stay

Thanks so much to Miriam Parker of Hachette Book Group for sending this ARC to me for review!

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Run For Your Life by James Patterson

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A calculating killer who calls himself The Teacher is taking on New York City, killing the powerful and the arrogant. His message is clear: remember your manners or suffer the consequences! For some, it seems that the rich are finally getting what they deserve. For New York’s elite, it is a call to terror.

Only one man can tackle such a high-profile case: Detective Mike Bennett. The pressure is enough for anyone, but Mike also has to care for his 10 children-all of whom have come down with virulent flu at once!

Discovering a secret pattern in The Teacher’s lessons, Detective Bennett realizes he has just hours to save New York from the greatest disaster in its history. From the #1 bestselling author comes BE AFRAID, the continuation of his newest, electrifying series.

This is the first James Patterson book that I have read in awhile and I am glad that I waited.  This book was a non-stop thrill from start to finish, and I can’t wait to read the rest of his books that have been collecting dust on my bookshelf for too long.

Mike Bennett has had a rough time lately.  His wife has recently passed away from cancer, leaving him a single parent of 10 children – thankfully he has Mary Catherine, an Irish nanny and confidant – someone who he can really count on in good times and bad.  He comes home after an exhausting day at work – a day in which he has negotiated a hostage situation, only to have the thug shot by someone in the crowd.  He knows there will be stacks of forms and the media will be out in full force, but he just wants a little sleep before then.  Unfortunately, his house is ravaged by the flu so there won’t be much sleep with so many sick kids.

He receives a call from his boss the following morning, and he expects it…after all, there was a man shot last night and he was the one in charge.  But this call is different, he is being asked to head a special team of officers to try and stop a killer.  And he’s the only man that might be able to do it.

The Teacher is a killer with a mission – he is going to teach the citizens of New York some manners if it kills him…or them.  And he knows how to do it without getting caught.  No one is safe, are you talking on your cellphone in a restaurant?  You could be next.  Condescending to someone in a high profile restaurant or store?  Better watch yourself, it could just be The Teacher, and he’s just waiting for you to make the wrong move so he can make his.

This book is extremely fast paces and a true nail biter – I wasn’t sure how it was going to end, and the way it did there is surely the possibility that we haven’t seen the end of The Teacher – I for one would love to have him back to wreak some more havoc!

James Patterson published his first thriller in 1976 and since then has become one of the best-known and bestselling writers of all time, with more than 140 million copies of his books sold worldwide. He is the author of the two most popular detective series of the past decade, featuring Alex Cross and the Women’s Murder Club, and he has written numerous other #1 bestsellers. He has won an Edgar Award–the mystery world’s highest honor–and his novels Kiss the Girls and Along Came aSpider were made into feature films starring Morgan Freeman. His charity, the James Patterson PageTurner Awards, has given hundreds of thousands of dollars to individuals and groups that promote the excitement of books and reading. He lives in Florida.

Thanks so much to Miriam Parker of Hachette Book Group for sending this ARC to me for review!

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Sucks to be Me by Kimberly Pauley

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Mina Hamilton’s parents want her dead. (Or undead to be precise.) They’re vampires, and like it or not, Mina must decide whether to become a vampire herself. But Mina’s more interested in hanging out with best friend Serena and trying to catch the eye of the too-hot-for-high-school Nathan Able than in the vampire training classes she’s being forced to take. How’s a girl supposed to find the perfect prom date and pass third-year French when her mom and dad are breathing down her neck–literally? 

Mina Hamilton has a good life.  A best friend who she can share her secrets and dreams with…even if she is in a Goth stage right now, and loving parents who would do anything for her.  Well, anything except be human.  They’re vampires and have been since Mina was a baby, and now that the Vampire Council has found out that they have a human child it is time for her to decide – stay human or become a vampire.  What a choice to make when you are only 16.

But, she agrees to at least go to the vampire classes and be sponsored by Uncle Mortie – this is a huge sacrifice already, in her mind.  But even though she is creeped out by the teacher of the classes – Vampire Council member Ms. Riley, Aubrey makes it all worthwhile.  He’s gorgeous and he seems totally interested in getting to know her better.  And she also make a new friend in George, a boy that belongs to her high school and who she comes to see as a true friend…or maybe a little bit more.  And there’s always Nathan, a boy she has had a crush on forever and who now seems to be showing an interest in her…or is he?

I really got a kick out of this book and thought it was easy to read and very clever.  I loved the pros and cons lists that Mina makes throughout the book and how each chapter starts with a “myth” about vampires and how she feels about it.   She is a character that I am hoping I will see again.

Kimberly Pauley loves a good book she can sink her teeth into. As her alter-ego, the Young Adult Books Goddess of yabookscentral.com, she has devoured more books than she can count. This is her first novel. She lives in Illinois.

 

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EW’s New Classics Books Perpetual Challenge

ews-new-classics1

 
I found this list at Entertainment Weekly and thought this would make a great perpetual challenge.  So, if you want to join, just sign up using the Mr. Linky below.  Also, please leave a comment and when you post a review please leave a link to that as well.  Thanks!

1. The Road , Cormac McCarthy (2006)
2. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling (2000)
3. Beloved, Toni Morrison (1987)
4. The Liars’ Club, Mary Karr (1995)
5. American Pastoral, Philip Roth (1997)
6. Mystic River, Dennis Lehane (2001)
7. Maus, Art Spiegelman (1986/1991)
8. Selected Stories, Alice Munro (1996)
9. Cold Mountain, Charles Frazier (1997)
10. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Haruki Murakami (1997)
11. Into Thin Air, Jon Krakauer (1997)
12. Blindness, José Saramago (1998)
13. Watchmen, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (1986-87)
14. Black Water, Joyce Carol Oates (1992)
15. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, Dave Eggers (2000)
16. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood (1986)
17. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel García Márquez (1988)
18. Rabbit at Rest, John Updike (1990)
19. On Beauty, Zadie Smith (2005)
20. Bridget Jones’s Diary, Helen Fielding (1998)
21. On Writing, Stephen King (2000)
22. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Díaz (2007)
23. The Ghost Road, Pat Barker (1996)
24. Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry (1985)
25. The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan (1989)
26. Neuromancer, William Gibson (1984)
27. Possession, A.S. Byatt (1990)
28. Naked, David Sedaris (1997)
29. Bel Canto, Anne Patchett (2001)
30. Case Histories, Kate Atkinson (2004)
31. The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien (1990)
32. Parting the Waters, Taylor Branch (1988)
33. The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion (2005)
34. The Lovely Bones, Alice Sebold (2002)
35. The Line of Beauty, Alan Hollinghurst (2004)
36. Angela’s Ashes, Frank McCourt (1996)
37. Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi (2003)
38. Birds of America, Lorrie Moore (1998)
39. Interpreter of Maladies, Jhumpa Lahiri (2000)
40. His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman (1995-2000)
41. The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros (1984)
42. LaBrava, Elmore Leonard (1983)
43. Borrowed Time, Paul Monette (1988)
44. Praying for Sheetrock, Melissa Fay Greene (1991)
45. Eva Luna, Isabel Allende (1988)
46. Sandman, Neil Gaiman (1988-1996)
47. World’s Fair, E.L. Doctorow (1985)
48. The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver (1998)
49. Clockers, Richard Price (1992)
50. The Corrections, Jonathan Franzen (2001)
51. The Journalist and the Murderer, Janet Malcom (1990)
52. Waiting to Exhale, Terry McMillan (1992)
53. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, Michael Chabon (2000)
54. Jimmy Corrigan, Chris Ware (2000)
55. The Glass Castle, Jeannette Walls (2006)
56. The Night Manager, John le Carré (1993)
57. The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Wolfe (1987)
58. Drop City, TC Boyle (2003)
59. Krik? Krak! Edwidge Danticat (1995)
60. Nickel & Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich (2001)
61. Money, Martin Amis (1985)
62. Last Train To Memphis, Peter Guralnick (1994)
63. Pastoralia, George Saunders (2000)
64. Underworld, Don DeLillo (1997)
65. The Giver, Lois Lowry (1993)
66. A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again, David Foster Wallace (1997)
67. The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini (2003)
68. Fun Home, Alison Bechdel (2006)
69. Secret History, Donna Tartt (1992)
70. Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell (2004)
71. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Ann Fadiman (1997)
72. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Mark Haddon (2003)
73. A Prayer for Owen Meany, John Irving (1989)
74. Friday Night Lights, H.G. Bissinger (1990)
75. Cathedral, Raymond Carver (1983)
76. A Sight for Sore Eyes, Ruth Rendell (1998)
77. The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro (1989)
78. Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert (2006)
79. The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell (2000)
80. Bright Lights, Big City, Jay McInerney (1984)
81. Backlash, Susan Faludi (1991)
82. Atonement, Ian McEwan (2002)
83. The Stone Diaries, Carol Shields (1994)
84. Holes, Louis Sachar (1998)
85. Gilead, Marilynne Robinson (2004)
86. And the Band Played On, Randy Shilts (1987)
87. The Ruins, Scott Smith (2006)
88. High Fidelity, Nick Hornby (1995)
89. Close Range, Annie Proulx (1999)
90. Comfort Me With Apples, Ruth Reichl (2001)
91. Random Family, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc (2003)
92. Presumed Innocent, Scott Turow (1987)
93. A Thousand Acres, Jane Smiley (1991)
94. Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser (2001)
95. Kaaterskill Falls, Allegra Goodman (1998)
96. The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown (2003)
97. Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson (1992)
98. The Predators’ Ball, Connie Bruck (1988)
99. Practical Magic, Alice Hoffman (1995)
100. America (the Book), Jon Stewart/Daily Show (2004)

Looks like I have A LOT of work to do on this list.  TBR pile just keeps growing, and growing:) 

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***Note:  Apparently the Mr. Linky isn’t working, so just leave me a comment and I’ll get back to you:)

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